Trying to keep it together

One of the issues I’m running into lately is trying to stay on top of my Ruby skills.

Web development can be intimidating for a beginner. In my chosen path I had to learn HTML, CSS, Javascript, Ruby, Ruby on Rails and Git. If you devote your time to one area then you’re neglecting something else you could be working on.

As I mentioned in an earlier post I’m working on learning Backbone JS and CoffeeScript. While I’ve made serious gains in those departments I’ve been forced to not spend much time on Ruby. In the long run I don’t anticipate this being a big deal, but in the short term, and by short term I mean CODING CHALLENGES and TECHNICAL INTERVIEWS, I worry about not being able to perform when the time calls.

Back in Rails flow, plus some Backbone JS

I mentioned in an earlier post that I was a bit rusty with Rails. Spent about 6 hours combined on my Acme Insurance app this week and I feel like I’m in the swing of things.

I started dabbling with Backbone JS this week. Why? Because I want to have cool looking apps that don’t require a browser refresh every time something is updated! Luckily for me it doesn’t seem to be too complicated for my skill level.

 

Back to Rails

Apart from the 3 day vacation I granted myself for my birthday (Yay!) I’ve spent the past 2 weeks completely ignoring Rails and concentrating on Ruby and Javascript. On top of that I haven’t added or modified any features on my Rails apps in nearly a month. Today I decided to get back into Rails and… let’s just say I’m a bit rusty.

I was feeling really frustrated, then I remembered the name of this blog, “A Single Step”. One step at a time.

Tomorrow I’ll be less rusty than today, plus I’ll have ┬áthat extra Ruby and JS knowledge I picked up.

Back to Basics

The past two weeks I haven’t touched any of my Rails projects. Instead I’ve “circled around” in a sense and I’ve been trying to fill in gaps in my Ruby and Javascript knowledge.

The Odin Project┬áhas been extremely helpful in the past 2 weeks. Basic questions such as those below were the type that I “knew” implicitly but couldn’t explain. I’ve made a commitment to being able to explain them:

  • How do you find values in both arrays?
  • What types of data are good to store in a hash
  • What is a module?

I also found Codewars, which provides coding challenges to actually apply what I’ve (re)learned from the Odin Project.

I believe the result of all of this will be

  • Increased coding ability and knowledge in JavaScript and Ruby
  • Increased coding ability in Rails
  • Better ability to verbally explain coding concepts